Trilok Singh, Wishing You All a Very Happy Makar Sankranti 2018. Have a great day ahead.

Makar or Makara (मकर) in Vedic astrology is the sign of Capricorn (Zodiac sign). Sankranti means transmigration (स्थानांतर- मन) of the sun from one Rashi (zodiac sign) to the next. Thus Makar Sankranti refers to the transition of the Sun into Makara Rashi (Capricorn) on its celestial (आकाशीय) path. It is a specific solar day in the Hindu calendar, which is usually observed in January, every year. Makar Sankranti is also celebrated as a festival in the reverence (श्रद्धा) of Sun deity, Surya. It also marks the end of the month with the winter solstice (शीतकालीन अयनांत) and start of longer days.

This festival, unlike other Hindu festivals, is not dependent on the position of the moon, but on position of the sun. On this day, the sun enters the zodiac sign of Capricorn. To compensate for the difference that occurs due to the revolution around the sun, every eighty years the day of Sankrantiis postponed by one day. In the present period Makar-Sankrantifalls on 14th January. Sankranti is considered a Deity. According to a legend Sankranti killed ademon named Sankarasur. The day followed by Makar Sankrantis called Kinkrant or Karidin. On this day, the female deity (devi) slayed the demon Kinkarasur.

Makar Sankranti’s information is available in the Panchang: The Panchang (Hindu Almanac) provides information on the form, age, clothing, direction of movement etc. of Sankranti. This information is appropriate to the changes taking place in Her according to time. He who is touched by Goddess Sankranti gets destroyed.

Makar Sankranti is a festival that is celebrated across the Indian Subcontinent. It is celebrated as Sankrat in Rajasthan, Uttarayan in Gujarat, Magh Bihu (or Bhogali Bihu) in Assam, Pongal in South Indian states like Tamil Nadu, etc. On this day is regarded as most auspicious. A big one-month long ‘Magha-Mela’ fair begins at Prayag (Allahabad) on this occasion. Apart from Triveni, ritual bathing also takes place at many places like Haridvar and Garh Mukteshwar in Uttar Pradesh, and Patna in Bihar.

While In Bengal every year a very big Mela is held at Ganga Sagar where the river Ganga is believed to have dived into the nether region and vivified the ashes of the sixty thousand ancestors of King Bhagirath. This mela is attended by a large number of pilgrims from all over the country.

In Tamil Nadu, Sankrantiis known by the name of ‘Pongal’, which takes its name from the surging of rice boiled in a pot of milk, and this festival has more significance than even Diwali. It is very popular particularly amongst farmers. Rice and pulses cooked together in ghee and milk is offered to the family deity after the ritual worship. In essence in the South this Sankrantiis a ‘Puja’ (worship) for the Sun God.

In Andhra Pradesh, it is celebrated as a three-day harvest festival Pongal. It is a big event for the people of Andhra Pradesh. The Telugus like to call it ‘Pedda Panduga’ meaning big festival. The whole event lasts for four days, the first day Bhogi, the second day Sankranti, the third day Kanuma and the fourth day, Mukkanuma.

In Karnataka, the festival is marked by visiting one’s friends and relatives to exchange greetings, and by the preparation of a dish called Ellu (made with sesame seeds, coconuts, sugar blocks, etc). A common custom found across Karnataka is the exchange of sugarcane pieces and Ellu with one’s neighbors, friends and relatives. In Karnataka, Pongal is known as ‘Sankranti’, and cows and bullocks are gaily decorated and fed ‘Pongal’- a sweet preparation of rice. Special prayers are offered. In the evening, the cattle are led out in procession to the beat of drums and music. In the night a bonfire is lit and the animals are made to jump over the fire.

Sankranti is marked by men, women and children wearing colorful clothing; visiting near and dear ones; and exchanging pieces of sugarcane, a mixture of fried til, molasses, pieces of dry coconut, peanuts and fried gram. On this auspicious day, people in Karnataka distribute Yellu and bella (Sesame seeds and Jaggery) and greet with the words ” “Ellu bella thindu, Olle Maathu Aadu” (Eat sesame seeds and speak only good). The significance of this exchange is that sweetness should prevail in all the dealings.

In Maharashtra, on the Sankranti day people exchange multi-colored tilguds made from til (sesame seeds) and sugar and til-laddus made from til and jaggery. Til-polis are offered for lunch. While exchanging tilguls as tokens of goodwill people greet each other saying – ‘til-gul ghya, god god bola’ meaning ‘accept these tilguls and speak sweet words’. The under-lying thought in the exchange of tilguls is to forget the past ill-feelings and hostilities and resolve to speak sweetly and remain friends.

This is a special day for the women in Maharashtra when married women are invited for a get-together called ‘Haldi-Kumkum’ and given gifts of any utensil, which the woman of the house purchases on that day. Hindus wear ornaments made of ‘Halwa’ on this day.

In Gujarat, Sankrantiis observed more or less in the same manner as in Maharashtra but with a difference that in Gujarat there is a custom of giving gifts to relatives. The elders in the family give gifts to the younger members of the family. The Gujarati Pundits on this auspicious day grant scholarships to students for higher studies in astrology and philosophy. This festival thus helps the maintenance of social relationships within the family, caste and community.

In Punjab, where December and January are the coldest months of the year, huge bonfires are lit on the eve of Sankrantiand which is celebrated as “LOHARI”. Sweets, sugarcane and rice are thrown in the bonfires, around which friends and relatives gather together. The following day, which is Sankrant, is celebrated as MAGHI. The Punjabi’s dance their famous Bhangra dance till they get exhausted. Then they sit down and eat the sumptuous food that is specially prepared for the occasion.

Many tribals in our country start their New Year from the day of Sankranti by lighting bonfires, dancing and eating their particular dishes sitting together. The Bhuya tribals of Orissa have their Maghyatra in which small home-made articles are put for sale.

In states like Gujarat and Rajasthan, this is one of the major festivals. In Gujarat, it is called “Uttarayan” and in Rajasthan, it is called “Sankrat”. People await this festival to fly kites (patang). In Gujarat, it is a two-day affair: 14th January is Uttarayan and 15th January is Vasi-Uttarayan (Stale – Uttarayan). In Assam, Makar Sankranti is celebrated as Magh Bihu or Bhogali Bihu. It is a harvest festival in Assam, which marks the end of harvesting in the month of Magha. In South Indian states like Tamil Nadu, it is celebrated as Pongal. Pongal is a four-day festival. This festival is also celebrated outside India in countries like Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan (in Sindh region).

Written By: Shubham Jain, YD Team.